Vitruvian MedPro

12
Aug
2013

HIPAA AND TEXTING

It is not uncommon for providers to use electronic devices such as cell phones and tablets to conduct their day to day functions within a healthcare facility or practice. Covered entities must ensure that The Health Care Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Privacy and Security rules are put in place when using mobile devices. At the same time, HIPAA does not provide any requirements towards the usage or avoidance of specific modes of communication such as using text messages.

Just like it is done with usage of other technologies such as EMR and Practice Management systems, all the safeguards must be put in place to ensure the privacy and security of Protected Health Information (PHI) that is communicated via text messaging.

Safeguards must address all the risks that exist with text messaging PHI. For example, devices that lack encryption such as mobile device-‐to-‐mobile device that are used for SMS text messages are generally not secure. Moreover, the sender of a text message can’t be assured that the messages being sent are being received by the receiver. Wireless carriers may also store messages that are sent via text messages. The Health and Human Services department states that using text messages as a way to communicate can be permitted under HIPAA depending on all the controls that are put in place.

The HHS recommends covered entities to follow the following five steps when managing mobile devices in your healthcare settings:

1. Decide whether mobile devices will be used to access, receive, transmit, or store patients’ health information or be used as part of your organization’s internal network or systems, such as an electronic health record system.
Understand the risks to your organization before you decide to allow the use of mobile devices.

2. Consider the risks when using mobile devices to transmit the health information your organization holds.
Conduct a risk analysis to identify threats and vulnerabilities. If you are a solo provider, you may conduct the risk analysis yourself. If you work for a large provider, the organization may conduct it.

3. Identify a mobile device risk management strategy, including privacy and security safeguards.
A risk management strategy will help your organization develop and implement mobile device safeguards to reduce risks identified in the risk analysis, including an evaluation and regular maintenance of the mobile device safeguards you put in place.

4. Develop, document, and implement your organization’s mobile device policies and procedures to safeguard health information.
Some topics to consider when developing mobile device policies and procedures are:

• Mobile device management
• Using your own device
• Restrictions on mobile device use
• Security or configuration settings for mobile devices

5. Conduct mobile device privacy and security awareness and ongoing training for providers and professionals.

For more information on texting and PHI visit: Five Steps Organizations Can Take To Manage Mobile Devices Used by Healthcare Professionals

At Vitruvian MedPro we help medical practices stay out of willful neglect by providing HIPAA Compliance consulting services. As part of our HIPAA Compliance consulting services, we help medical practices perform and document a risk analysis. We provide medical practices with a thorough risk management report describing their risks and vulnerabilities with PHI.
A free consultation of 30 minutes or less will let you know whether your practice would be found under willful neglect in the case of an audit.

For more information on Vitruvian MedPro’s HIPAA Compliance kit visit: HIPAA Compliance Kit.

At Vitruvian MedPro we help medical practices improve cash flow by providing medical billing, medical coding, and patient collection services. Visit our web site at Vitruvian MedPro

02
Aug
2013

Medical Practices must comply with the HIPAA Omnibus Rule by September 23

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability (HIPAA) Omnibus Rule, enacted in March, includes expanded obligations of physicians and other health care providers to protect patients’ protected health information (PHI). Obligations have been extended from covered entities to other individuals and companies who, as Business Associates (BA), have access to PHI. Increase in the penalties for violations under any of these obligations will be applied under the Omnibus Rule.

The Omnibus Rule goal is to further protect patient privacy and safeguard patients’ health information through our digital age with increased protection and control of personal health information and increased accountability for BA. The Omnibus Rule has put in place a number of legislation that range from expanding individual patient rights to their PHI, to determining the use of PHI for employee training, marketing, fundraising, and researching purposes, and notification plan for breaches. BA relationships and agreements should also be reviewed for compliance. Of importance are those BA agreements entered before January 25, 2013.

The requirements needed to comply with the HIPAA Omnibus Rule:

• Review BA agreement to abide with new Omnibus Rule and review existing agreements and contractor arrangements to determine compliance.
• Update HIPAA policies and procedures to address response to potential breaches of unsecured PHI.
• Update, post and distribute Notices of Privacy Practice.
• Put in place restrictions on the use of PHI for marketing, sales, and fundraising.
• Train medical practice staff on new obligations. Training must be documented. If it is not documented, it did not happen.

These existing BA agreements entered before January 25, 2013 remain compliant until changed or renewed, or by September 22, 2014.

Enforcement efforts begin September 23, 2013, and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of Civil Rights (OCR) will audit and penalize covered entities for willful neglect after the deadline with a maximum penalty of up to $1.5 million per violation.

At Vitruvian MedPro we help medical practices stay out of willful neglect by providing HIPAA Compliance consulting services. As part of our HIPAA Compliance consulting services, we help medical practices perform and document a risk analysis. We provide medical practices with a thorough risk management report describing their risks and vulnerabilities with PHI.

A free consultation of 30 minutes or less will let you know whether your practice would be found under willful neglect in the case of an audit.

For more information on Vitruvian MedPro’s HIPAA Compliance kit visit: HIPAA Compliance Kit.

At Vitruvian MedPro we help medical practices improve cash flow by providing medical billing, medical coding, and patient collection services. Visit our web site at Vitruvian MedPro

01
Aug
2013

MAKING SENSE OF OUTSOURCING MEDICAL BILLING

All the changes that are happening in the healthcare industry in the next few years will challenge the way medical practices operate. Physicians are going to be pressed to see more patients with the new influx of patients that will come into the health care system with Obamacare (this is if Obamacare was to be fully implemented).

Doctors main focus is patient care and not running the business side of their practice. If Obamacare was to be fully implemented, doctors and their staff will be facing the challenge of having to provide care to more patients and keep up with all the changes that are taking place on the business side. All the changes in coding and billing represent a challenge for medical practices. It is now more important than ever for medical practices to focus more on patient care and not on how to collect their money. At Vitruvian MedPro, we help doctors focus on helping their patients and leave the billing side of the business to us. We work with insurance companies and government agencies on a daily basis and strive to make sure that our clients receive their due reimbursements. Trying to keep up with the business of providing care is hard enough. Keeping up with all the revenue cycle management side of the business should be left to the experts.

Health Care Providers that are striving to stay independent and not become part of a hospital or become a part of a larger practice are facing the need to cut costs while building and maintaining the patients that they see. Independent providers that have given into selling their practices realize that they lose control of their independence and don’t enjoy being told what to do. For those physicians that want to stay independent and succeed, outsourcing their medical billing makes sense. But outsourcing, doctors are able to focus on providing care and growing their practice. Outsourcing billing companies like Vitruvian MedPro, charge the doctor a percentage of the money that is actually collected. If the doctor does not get paid for claim, the doctor will not receive a bill for that claim. At Vitruvian MedPro, we get paid only after the doctor gets paid.

With the looming shortage of doctors across all specialties, doctors will be facing an influx of new patients into their practice. If doctors and their staff will need to spend all their time taking care of patients, outsourcing makes sense. With additional influx of patients, medical practices will have less time to spend on the revenue cycle management side of the business. Outsourcing the business side of the practice to a company that keeps up with all the changes in coding and billing interacts with insurance companies and Medicare and Medicaid on a daily basis.

At Vitruvian MedPro Consulting, we are more than medical billers. We are certified medical reimbursement specialists by the American Medical Billing Association. We can help medical practices at any stage of the revenue cycle management process. Our goal is to help medical practices improve cash flow and focus on patient care.

Please visit our medical billing page to learn more about our iClaim services at: Medical Billing Services

We are currently offering a free practice analysis to help medical practitioners determine whether it makes sense to outsource their billing. Gives us a call at 781-454-7406 and schedule your free demo.

At Vitruvian MedPro, a Brookline, Massachusetts revenue cycle management company, we work with medical practices of all sizes with any aspect of their revenue cycle management. Besides billing, we can help practices with their coding, account receivables and make sure that practices receive the highest reimbursements from the insurance companies.

30
Jul
2013

Medical Billing Optimizing Revenue Generation

On a day to day basis a medical practice is busy with taking care of patients and running the back end operations. The staff is busy scheduling patients, seeing the daily inflow of patients, calling insurance companies to request authorizations or follow up on claims, etc. In such a dynamic and hectic environment it is not uncommon to see mistakes being made that result in the reducing revenue and increasing expenses.

Whether the practice does its billing in house or it outsources this function, mistakes can be avoided by putting processes in place that will help the practice staff be more efficient while optimizing revenue generation for the practice. Following are five recommendations that medical practices can implement in order to improve their day to day processes:

1. Make a copy of patients insurance cards

An office policy must, is to always make photocopies of patients insurance id cards. Insurance cards can be scanned directly into the practices EMR or can be copied and scanned into the EMR system. Insurance ID cards should be copied or scanned on both sides as they provide important information that is required to submit a claim. The practice must educate its patients on bringing in their newest insurance card every time they come for an appointment even if they claim that the information has not changed. There are instances when the patient is not the primary policy holder of the insurance and is not aware of any changes to the insurance policy. Also, employers may change insurance companies or change plans requiring the practice to update the insurance information in its system.

2. Putting in place a system to submit claims on time

Filing medical claims in a timely manner is vital to a medical practice financial success. The sooner a medical claim is filed, the sooner the practice will get paid. Most insurance companies have time frame limits for a practice to submit a claim from the date of service. Claims that are submitted even a day late from the insurance time frame limit requirements will be denied and the practice will not get paid. Claims that are filed outside of the time limit set forth by the insurance companies will not get paid. Insurance companies time filing limits vary from company to company, the medical practice must be aware of the time filing limits of every insurance company the practice files claims with.

3. Reviewing the practices coding practices

Medical coding translates what took place during a patient visit and determine the level of payment that a medical practice will receive. It is important for medical practices to review their coding practices on a regular basis to make sure that the practice is not under-coding or over-coding. The person doing the coding should be the provider diagnosing the patient or a certified professional coder that can translate what was documented during the patient’s visit into the proper diagnosis and procedure codes. When hiring a certified professional coder, medical practitioners should provide detailed encounter documentation so that the coder can assign the correct diagnosis and procedure codes to the visit.

4. Reviewing clearinghouse reports

Most medical practices today submit their medical claims electronically through a clearing house. Clearinghouses provide a report after a claim has been submitted with information regarding the submission. Some claims will pass through the clearinghouse and get submitted directly to the payer while some claims get rejected and are sent back to the sender for review. Reviewing clearing house reports on a daily basis will ensure that those claims that get rejected at the clearinghouse level get reviewed, fixed and re-submitted on a timely manner. Not reviewing clearinghouse rejected claims on time can result in late time filing submissions which result in the practice not getting paid. Some claims that are rejected at the clearinghouse level can be easily fixed and re-submitted.

5. Follow up on claims and obtaining aging reports

Practices must make it a standard operating procedure to run aging reports on a regular basis. Aging reports will help the practice follow up and take action on the outstanding claims that have not been paid. Not following up on aging reports can cost the practice a lot of money. The hectic day to day operations of a medical practice may prevent the staff from regularly checking the status of the practice claims until someone notices that cash flow levels are down. Regularly running aging reports and follow up of the reports will help reduce insurance denials and rejections.

Please visit our medical billing page to learn more about our iClaim services at: Medical Billing Services

We are currently offering a free practice analysis to help medical practitioners determine whether it makes sense to outsource their billing. Gives us a call at 781-454-7406 and schedule your free demo.

At Vitruvian MedPro we work with medical practices of all sizes with any aspect of their revenue cycle management. Besides billing, we can help practices with their coding, account receivables and make sure that practices receive the highest reimbursements from the insurance companies.

25
Jul
2013

Hipaa Omninus rules and doctors in private practice

Private practice doctors have until Sept. 23, 2013 to implement all the latest HIPAA policies and procedures under the Omnibus rules. These policies and procedures are required in order to comply with all the changes that have been made to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA).

The department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of Civil Rights (OCR) released the final omnibus rules in January of 2013 and will start enforcing these rules on Sept. 23, 2013. The HHS has made it clear that penalties to healthcare providers that are found in ‘willful neglect’ can range in between $100.00 to $1,500,000.00. The amount of the penalty will depend on the type of violation that the covered entity has committed.

In order to update their compliance programs, doctors in private practice must:

1. Perform and document a risk analysis. The risk analysis consists on doing an accurate and detailed assessment of all the potential risks and vulnerabilities that their practice is exposed to the confidentiality, integrity and availability of Protected Health Information (PHI). The outcome of the risk analysis should be a documented in a risk management report that describes all risks and vulnerabilities of the medical practice to PHI.
2. Review and update the medical practice’s policies and procedures in the case that PHI is lost, stolen or improperly disclosed. The medical practice must ensure that all staff members are properly trained on the updated policies and procedures.
3. Make sure that all the devices that hold PHI such as workstations, laptops, tablets, mobile phones, etc., are encrypted. The encryption of these devices will prevent PHI to be accessed in the case that the devices is lost or stolen.
4. Work with their HER vendor to make sure that the medical practice’s HER system is updated to flag information that patients do not want the medical practice to share with the insurance companies.
5. Put in place a process that provides the practice the ability to provide patients their medical record information in electronic format.
6. Review an update the medical practice’s contracts with its business associates. Business associates are people not employed by the practice who have access to PHI.
7. Updating the notice of privacy practices. The updated notice of privacy practices must be displayed for patients to see and must be posted on the medical practice’s web site.

At Vitruvian MedPro we help medical practices stay out of willful neglect by providing HIPAA Compliance consulting services. As part of our HIPAA Compliance consulting services, we help medical practices perform and document a risk analysis. We provide medical practices with a thorough risk management report describing their risks and vulnerabilities with PHI.

A free consultation of 30 minutes or less will let you know whether your practice would be found under willful neglect in the case of an audit.

For more information on Vitruvian MedPro’s HIPAA Compliance kit visit: HIPAA Compliance Kit.

At Vitruvian MedPro we help medical practices improve cash flow by providing medical billing, medical coding, and patient collection services. Visit our web site at Vitruvian MedPro

23
Jul
2013

HIPAA Compliance KitHIPAA OMNIBUS RULES AND BUSINESS ASSOCIATES

Covered entities (healthcare providers) have until Sept. 23, 2013 to implement all the policies and procedures under the Omnibus rules. These policies and procedures are required in order to comply with all the changes that have been made to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA).

The OCR department of Health and Human Services (HHS) released the final omnibus rules in January of 2013 and will start enforcing these rules on Sept. 23, 2013. HHS has made it clear that penalties can range between $100 to $1,500,000.00, depending on the type of violation that the covered entity has committed.

One of the most important changes that come with the final omnibus rule are with covered entities relations with their business associates. These rules affect the working relations that exist between a covered entity and its business associates. Business associates are those vendors that have access to a covered entity’s Protected Health Information (PHI). With the new rules, business associates are responsible to secure PHI just like covered entities are. In other words, business associates need to be HIPAA Compliant and can face the same kind of penalties covered entities face. With the Omnibus Rules, vendors that have access to PHI need to comply with all the HIPAA regulations.

Even though a covered entity’s business associates are required to be HIPAA compliant, in the case of a breach on the part of the business associate, the covered entity is responsible for sending notifications to its patients and for reporting the breach to HHS.

Covered entities must review all their business associate contracts to make sure that these are updated to meet all the omnibus requirements. Business associates such as health information technology companies and consultants have put in place business associate agreements that does not make them responsible for the loss of patient data. With the final omnibus rules, business associates need to sign agreements that abide by the final omnibus rules. Medical practices must make sure that all their business associate agreements are updated and signed.

At Vitruvian MedPro we help medical practices stay out of willful neglect by providing HIPAA Compliance consulting services. As part of our HIPAA Compliance consulting services, we provide updated business associate agreements. We also help medical practices Reach out to us to review your current HIPAA Compliance Program. A free consultation of 30 minutes or less will let you know whether your practice would be found under willful neglect in the case of an audit.

For more information on Vitruvian MedPro’s HIPAA Compliance kit visit: HIPAA Compliance Kit.

18
Jul
2013

HIPAA Compliance

HIPAA


HIPAA Patient Rights

One important aspect of HIPAA is that it gives patient rights. Covered entities are responsible for looking after the rights of their patients.

HIPAA provides patients with a number of rights with respect to their Protected Health Information (PHI). For example, patients have the right to request additional restrictions on the disclosure and use of their PHI. These requests need to be reviewed by the HIPAA Compliance Officer who is not required to honor the request. Similarly, patients have the right to request changes to their records, but medical practices do not have to honor the request if the record is complete and accurate, or if the information the patient seeks to amend was obtained from another provider.

Under HIPAA patients have the right to obtain an accounting of the Covered Entity’s disclosures of PHI from the Covered Entity. Under HITECH, medical practices must provide an accounting of disclosures made for payment, treatment or health care operations; disclosures to the patient; or incidental disclosures made in the course of a required or permitted disclosure.

Patients also have a right, with some exceptions, to inspect and copy their records. Exceptions include situations in which the records include psychotherapy notes and situations in which records were prepared in connection with legal proceedings. In some situations, a medical practice’s refusal to provide access to information can entitle the patient to challenge the refusal through a review process. Medical practices may charge their patients a “reasonable, cost-based fee” for copying and providing the records.

Finally, patients have a right to receive the HIPAA Notice of Privacy Practices.

Failure to abide by the HIPAA patient rights regulations can end in the patient reporting a complaint to the Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of Civil Rights (OCR). A complaint made to the HHS OCR can end in the practice being audited and fined in the case that willful neglect is found.

At Vitruvian MedPro we help medical practices stay out of willful neglect by providing HIPAA Compliance consulting services. Reach out to us to review your current HIPAA Compliance Program. A free consultation of 30 minutes or less will let you know whether your practice would be found under willful neglect in the case of an audit.

For more information on Vitruvian MedPro’s HIPAA Compliance kit visit:

17
Jul
2013

outsource to Massachusetts medical billing company

The medical billing and revenue cycle management aspects of a medical practice are keys to its success. Medical billing is among the most important processes within a medical practice. At the end of the day, the cash flow levels of a medical practice depend on how the billing is done. Medical practitioners have to decide whether they want to do the billing themselves or whether they want to outsource the billing functions to a medical billing company. In order to determine what makes the most sense medical practitioners need to take into account the size of the practice, its costs and the volume of patients that flow through the practice on a daily basis.

Some medical practices are reluctant to outsource their medical billing because they fear that they will lose control over the financial aspect of their practices. It is easy and convenient for some physicians to have direct access to their medical billing team in order to address any issues that arise. At the same time, some doctors that have developed an in house team to do the billing have invested a lot of time and money on their practice management software and team of medical billers. However, medical practitioners have to realize that running an in house billing team will cost a significant amount of money. Other than the costs of the costs to install and maintain a practice management system, practices will have to pay additional salaries and benefits to their employees. Not to mention, employee retention is an issue that can cost the practice a significant amount when considering the delay in submitting and following up on claims if the practice’s biller quits, is out sick, or takes time off.

At Vitruvian MedPro, we help medical practices increase cash flow by providing medical billing and revenue cycle management services. By outsourcing to our Massachusetts based medical billing company, medical practitioners can focus on providing care and do not have to worry about the set up and daily operations of a billing department. We provide the transparency our clients need so that they can stay in control of the revenue cycle management of their organization. Our software solutions are web based and can be accessed 24/7 from any computer with internet access. At the same time, our vast number of reports provide medical practices with a real time snapshot of their finances. At Vitruvian MedPro we focus on doing medical billing and stay on top of all aspect of the medical claim process such as constant follow ups on submitted claims and appealing denials.

Please visit our medical billing page to learn more about our iClaim services at: Medical Billing Services

We are currently offering a free practice analysis to help medical practitioners determine whether it makes sense to outsource their billing.

At Vitruvian MedPro we work with medical practices of all sizes with any aspect of their revenue cycle management. Besides billing, we can help practices with their coding, account receivables and make sure that practices receive the highest reimbursements from the insurance companies.

15
Jul
2013

Elements of the Notice of Privacy Practices

Content of the Notice.

One important requirement under the final HIPAA Omnibus Rule is that covered entities must update their notice of privacy practices. Below are the elements that are required to be a part of the updated Notice of Privacy Practices.

Covered entities are required to provide a notice of privacy practices in plain language that describes:

1. How the covered entity may use and disclose protected health information about an individual.

2. The individual’s rights with respect to the information and how the individual may exercise these
rights, including how the individual may complain to the covered entity.

3. The covered entity’s legal duties with respect to the information, including a statement that the
covered entity is required by law to maintain the privacy of protected health information.

4. Whom individuals can contact for further information about the covered entity’s privacy policies.

5. The notice must include an effective date.

6. The HITECH Act also states that if a medical practice shares information electronically with another
covered entity, that information must be listed in the Notice of Privacy Practices. Examples that must be
disclosed: A physician office is electronically connected to transmit and/or receive lab reports from on
outside vendor through the practice’s EMR.

Required Additions by the HITECH Omnibus Rule: All covered entities must include the following in their
notice of privacy practices:

7. A statement that the following uses and disclosures will be made only with authorization from the
individual:
 uses and disclosures for marketing purposes;
 uses and disclosures that constitute the sale of PHI;
 most uses and disclosures of psychotherapy notes (if the covered entity maintains psychotherapy
notes); and
 other uses and disclosures not described in the notice

8. A statement regarding an individual’s right to notice in the event of a breach

9. Notice of the right to opt out of fundraising communications (if the covered entity conducts
fundraising)

10. Health care providers must include in their notice of privacy practices a statement about an
individual’s right to restrict disclosures of protected health information to health plans if an individual
has paid for services out of pocket in full.

11. Health plans (except for long-term care plans) must include in their notice of privacy practices a
statement that the health plan is prohibited from using or disclosing genetic information for
underwriting purposes.

Notes: A covered entity is required to promptly revise and distribute its notice whenever it makes
material changes to any of its privacy practices. See 45 CFR 164.520(b)(3), 164.520(c)(1)(i)(C) for health
plans, and 164.520(c)(2)(iv) for covered health care providers with direct treatment relationships with
individuals. All patients must sign that they have received the updated Notice. The HITECH Omnibus is a
material change to the Notice and therefore requires resigning of the Receipt of NPP by all of your
patients.

You must include your Notice of Privacy Practices on your web site (if you have one) and post or place a
copy in your waiting area.

At Vitruvian MedPro we help medical practices stay out of willful neglect by providing HIPAA Compliance consulting services. Reach out to us to review your current HIPAA Compliance Program. A free consultation of 30 minutes or less will let you know whether your practice would be found under willful neglect in the case of an audit.

For more information on Vitruvian MedPro’s HIPAA Compliance kit visit: HIPAA Compliance Kit .

Outsource Medical Billing
15
Jul
2013

Medical Billing Fighting Timely Denials

Know your state’s law on timely filing limitations. Also, you should know the time limits for all carriers in which your doctor/client participates with. The contract for participation will define timely limitations.

Example from BCBS of Arizona: BCBSAZ asks providers to submit complete and accurate claims, preferably within 30 days of service, and require submission within one year of the date of service. BCBSAZ will deny any claims received more than one year after the date of service. Members are not liable to a BCBSAZ contracted provider for payment of a claim on which BCBSAZ denied payment for lack of timely filing. For the Federal Employee Program (FEP), the claim submission deadline is December 31 of the year immediately following the year in which service was rendered.

For paper claims – always send certified/return receipt so you have proof the claims were received. You can use the return receipt for proof that the claim was received timely.

For faxed claims
– always ensure that your machine prints out a “faxed received” message you can use as proof that the intended party in fact did receive your fax.

For electronic claims – use your clearinghouse submission report as proof a claim was submitted timely. Some carriers will accept a “print screen” printout of the filed date from your billing software program.

Non-participating Payer Denial

The Benefit Argument – this argument is one you can use to appeal to the carrier by framing it as 1) we are not obligated to file claims on behalf of your insured. 2) Your insured purchased health insurance in good faith and this is a covered benefit they are entitled to receive benefits for. In the above example (BCBS AZ) the patient would have had up to a year, so you could throw that date out since the provider isn’t obligated to file a claim for non-participating (excluding Medicare) carriers.

ERISA

And finally, ERISA can be your best defense. Under ERISA, state law has no jurisdiction, and neither do plan limitations. See 29 USC 18, 1003(a) and 1144(a) http://codes.lp.findlaw.com/uscode/29/18/I/B/5/1144 and US Supreme Court Decision in Davilla vs. Aetna and Calad vs. Cigna for references. Note that you must have the patient’s written permission to pursue an ERISA violation/denial unless the patient is willing to pursue denial him/herself.

At Vitruvian MedPro, we help medical practices increase cash flow by making sure that all claims are submitted on time. Claims submission status is followed up on a regular basis to make sure that the providers gets reimbursed for the services provided. Our state of the art practice management system helps us stay on top of the revenue cycle of every practice. For more information visit our web site at: